La Comunità per L'Ulivo, per tutto L'Ulivo dal 1995
FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Informazioni aggiornate periodicamente da redattori e forumisti

Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda trilogy il 02/09/2011, 11:27

Europe's debt solution?
By Marcus Oscarsson
Marcus Oscarsson [1]August 15, 2011 10:50
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news ... rement-age

High retirement ages have helped Scandinavians keep public debt under control.

STOCKHOLM, Sweden — When France raised the retirement age from 60 to 62 last year, three million people took to the streets in protests.
Not so in Sweden. The Scandinavian kingdom, which already has European Union’s highest retirement age, plans to raise it even more. No protests are planned.

As Europe and the United States tackle crippling public debts, under the close watch of volatile markets, some countries have found a working solution. Adjusting the retirement age has proven a successful tool in the fight against skyrocketing public debts and budget deficits across Europe. Properly handled, it could help stabilize the increasingly shaky euro. But when sprung on an unsuspecting and unprepared population, it can bring protesters to the streets and bring down presidents.

It is not a pure coincidence that the economies of Sweden, Norway and Denmark are in better shape than those of Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal. The big difference in retirement age plays a big role. Sweden’s statutory retirement age is 65 and the actual exit age, which is lower due to various early retirement schemes, is 64.3 according to Eurostat’s most recent figures. That is the highest in the EU.

As most European nations implement severe austerity plans Sweden has instead reduced its income tax. The Nordic monarchy has been praised for weathering the global economic crisis and was called the "North Star" by The Economist for having an annual growth of 6 percent the first six months of 2011 and being the only EU member set to reduce its gross debt between 2008 and 2012. “We don’t have to raise taxes or make any budget cuts,” said Swedish Finance Minister Anders Borg last week.

Earlier this year, Sweden launched a commission to study retirement. “As the life expectancy increases, more people need to work longer than today. Too many leave before turning 65. This is about increasing the actual exit age,” said Sweden’s Secretary of Social Insurances, Ulf Kristersson. The commission will consider limiting early retirement schemes, raising the age that workers are entitled to keep their jobs from 67 to 69, and further raising the statutory age of retirement. “More people need to work longer than today or the pensions will decrease,” Kristersson said.

The Swedish plans did not spark a single street protest. Swedes put a lot of trust in their authorities and accept that the government plays a large role in citizens' lives, both taxing them heavily and paying generously for health care, education and family leave. Perhaps Swedes' trust is justified: Sweden consistently ranks as having low corruption in Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index.

In contrast, when French President Nicholas Sarkozy said France had no choice but to raise its retirement age, one of Europe’s lowest, from 60 to 62, it sparked seven one-day strikes across the nation. From Paris to Marseille workers rallied against Sarkozy, whose approval ratings plunged.

Meanwhile, Greece, Ireland and Portugal have been forced to accept bailouts from the EU and International Monetary Fund to keep their economies afloat. Italy and Spain have implemented harsh austerity measures. The skyrocketing pension costs hobbling the troubling economies are a general problem and northern European governments are disinclined to keep financing early retirements in the south.

Greeks, Portuguese and Irish can generally begin drawing pensions at age 65. But there are major differences in the actual exit age: Sweden has the same retirement age for both men and women but Greece, Italy and United Kingdom have 65 for men and 60 for women, despite a recent European Court of Justice ruling stating that different pension ages based on gender violates the principle of equal treatment. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has found [5] that the effective age of retirement in many European countries, including Greece, Ireland, Spain and Italy, is years younger than the statutory age.

In the last two years, several EU members have had no choice but to raise the retirement age. Germany raised the retirement age from 65 to 67, Ireland and United Kingdom plan to raise it from 65 to 66, and Spain from 65 to 67. When Greece promised austerity in return for its bailout, Greek social affairs minister Andreas Loverdos said that the average actual retirement age would be raised from 53 to 67. “This is about saving the country from collapse,” he told the Financial Times.

Following the recent U.S. budget deal, a congressional committee will have the daunting task of proposing more than $1 trillion worth of cuts by Thanksgiving. One possibility is to raise the age for Medicare eligibility to 67. If that happens, perhaps U.S. politicians should study how Italy sold its retirement age hike to the public last summer.

As pension reforms sparked outrage across Europe, the Italian parliament quietly increased the retirement age by more than three years. “It's Europe's most sweeping pension reform, without a single day of demonstrations,” Economy Minister Giulio Tremonti said. The Berlusconi administration used a sophisticated method to raise the retirement age from 65 to 68.5 years by 2050 by adjusting it gradually according to life expectancy projections. The first adjustment will occur in 2015, the second in 2019 and subsequent adjustments every 3 years thereafter, saving the government more than $100 billion.

In response to the European Court of Justice ruling, the retirement age for women in the Italian public sector was raised from 61 to 65, to be the same as for men. Welfare minister Maurizio Sacconi said that Italy could have complied with the court ruling by lowering the retirement age for men to 61 — but markets might have reacted badly.
Chiunque ha tentato di creare uno Stato perfetto, un paradiso in terra, ha in realtà realizzato un inferno. Popper
Avatar utente
trilogy
Redattore
Redattore
 
Messaggi: 4196
Iscritto il: 23/05/2008, 22:58

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda trilogy il 02/09/2011, 12:25

Un articolo di Mohamed A. El-Erian esperto di PIMCO, uno dei più grandi fondi d'investimento in obbligazioni del mondo.
fonte: http://www.project-syndicate.org/contributor/1815

In sostanza formula tre possibili scenari per la crisi dell'eurozona:

Il primo è una rottura disordinata della zona euro. Solo gli amanti del caos possono puntare su questo risultato, ma è possibile se i governi dei paesi più ricchi continueranno ad esitare nel coinvolgere i loro bilanci; se i governi periferici abbandoneranno i loro sforzi di riforma fiscale, e / o se le società non potranno più tollerare stagnazione economica, aumento della disoccupazione, e l'austerità di bilancio.

il secondo è quello preferito dagli scienziati politici e dai visionari europei: maggiore unione fiscale tra i 17 membri della zona euro, o, in termini più morbidi, la volontà tedesca di fare per la zona euro quello che ha fatto per la Germania orientale - vale a dire, firmare dei grossi assegni per gli anni a venire. In cambio, la Germania insisterebbe sulla governance delle riforme economiche, forzando gli stati membri dell'eurozona cedere alcune delle proprie prerogative di
bilancio nazionale.

Il terzo è quello abbracciato da numerosi economisti. Si tratta di creare una zona euro più piccola economicamente più coerente, composta dai paesi più ricchi e dai paesi loro vicini. All'interno di un'unione fiscale più forte e con difese più credibili contro il contagio. In questo processo 2-3 economie periferiche dovrebbero prendersi un “congedo sabbatico” dall'euro, garantendosi immediatamente dalla incertezza economica con un accesso a una gamma molto più ampia di strumenti per affrontare i loro problemi di debito e la mancanza di competitività

Europe’s Central Bank at Sea
Mohamed A. El-Erian
2011-08-16


NEWPORT BEACH – Central bank purists are confused. How can the European Central Bank, a Germanic institution, now be in the business of buying government bonds issued by five of its 17 members? Why is this monetary authority acting like a fiscal agency? Isn’t the ECB supposed to be a politically independent and operationally autonomous institution committed to fighting inflation and safeguarding the currency?

Well, yes and no. And that answer speaks to the disturbing realities of modern-day central banking (or, to be more exact, central banking in the post-bubble world of debt overhangs and sovereign-debt concerns). It also sheds light on the endgame now taking shape in a confused and unsettled eurozone.

A sea-faring analogy simplifies some of the complexity. Imagine that a highly agile coast-guard vessel is called out to rescue a floundering boat. As the rescue is taking place, the vessel finds that it must also rescue two other, larger boats. It does so, but not before the captain receives assurances that a larger ship is coming to assist.

As the crew of the now-burdened rescue vessel waits for relief, they are forced to deal with restless passengers. With the ocean getting rougher, the once-agile rescue vessel is now so overburdened that some officers are second-guessing the captain, who again calls for the larger ship to help. Unfortunately, this ship seems hostage to a confused sense of mission and a distinct lack of urgency.

The overwhelming hope is that the larger ship will come and save the day. The fear is that it may not. And the question then becomes whether the crew of the struggling rescue vessel will decide that they can stabilize the situation only through a once-unthinkable action – throwing someone overboard to lighten the vessel and save the rest.

In a nutshell, this is the ECB’s situation today. The outcome is both uncertain and highly consequential – for Europe, of course, but also for a global economy that is in the midst of a synchronized slowdown and operating with a weakened anchor, owing to America’s recent debt-ceiling debacle and the humiliating loss of its AAA sovereign credit rating.

The ECB has already purchased almost a €100 billion of peripheral government bonds, and it is committed to buying a lot more. Less visibly, it has acquired many times the current volume in so-called “repo operations,” through which the ECB provides euros to struggling banks in a “temporary and reversible” exchange for the government bonds on their balance sheets.

Clearly, back in 2009, the ECB did not make the controversial call that Greece was insolvent, not illiquid. My own sense is that it was able but unwilling, owing to its fear of collateral damage for the rest of the eurozone. It opted for delay in the hope that the eurozone’s most vulnerable members would reinforce their defenses against Greek contagion.

In that sense, the ECB may have been too trusting. It believed that the peripheral economies would deliver serious fiscal austerity, notwithstanding their dreadful growth outlook and general lack of competitiveness. It also believed that the core countries would relieve the ECB burden of mounting bailout costs.

But, even if the ECB has limitless patience, the rest of the world does not. Markets understand that the ECB cannot forever substitute for other government agencies, so they repeatedly call into question its bridging strategy. Without these other agencies’ help, the ECB’s unprecedented actions will end up being a bridge to nowhere.

Whichever way you look at it, the ECB – and with it Europe – is being forced into an endgame with three once-improbable outcomes. That endgame will play out in weeks and months, not quarters and years.

The first alternative is a disorderly breakup of the eurozone. Only chaos-lovers wish for such an outcome, but it is possible if core governments continue to hesitate in engaging their balance sheets; if peripheral governments abandon their fiscal-reform efforts; and/or if societies can no longer tolerate economic stagnation, high and rising unemployment, and budget austerity.

The second is the one preferred by political scientists and European visionaries: greater fiscal union among the 17 eurozone members, or, in blunt terms, German willingness to do for the eurozone what it did for eastern Germany – namely, write large checks for years to come. In return, Germany would insist on economic-governance reforms that force other eurozone members to surrender some of their national fiscal prerogatives.

The third alternative is the one embraced by several economists. It involves creating a smaller and more economically coherent eurozone, which would consist of core and near-core countries within a tighter fiscal union and more credible defenses against contagion. In the process, 2-3 peripheral economies would take a sabbatical from the euro, underwriting immediate economic uncertainty with access to a much wider range of instruments to deal with their debt overhangs and lack of competitiveness.

Although the endgame is close, it is impossible to predict which alternative will prevail. That will depend on decisions taken by politicians with low approval ratings, noisy oppositions, and inadequate coordination. Moreover, implementation will likely prove far from automatic, thereby testing the resolve of governments and institutions.

My sense is that politicians will opt for a weak variant of greater fiscal union, but that, ultimately they will fail to execute it for the eurozone as we know it today. After some considerable volatility, a smaller and more robust currency union will emerge; and, importantly, Europe will avoid the euro’s demise and a total breakdown of the eurozone.

No matter how you view it, the coming endgame will be neither simple, nor orderly. Had the ECB known this at the start of Europe’s debt crisis, it might have resisted taking so many risks with its balance sheet and reputation. Then again, it probably could not have done otherwise – just as our once-agile rescue vessel never really had the choice of remaining safely in port.

Mohamed A. El-Erian is CEO and co-CIO of PIMCO, and author of When Markets Collide.
Chiunque ha tentato di creare uno Stato perfetto, un paradiso in terra, ha in realtà realizzato un inferno. Popper
Avatar utente
trilogy
Redattore
Redattore
 
Messaggi: 4196
Iscritto il: 23/05/2008, 22:58

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda flaviomob il 03/09/2011, 22:58

Secondo me finirà col congedo sabbatico... solo che il sabba sarà molto più lungo del previsto... l'Europa non ha una cultura comune, soprattutto sul piano etico ed economico, è mancata la costruzione di una Unione omogenea e segnata da diritti certi e diffusi accompagnati da senso del dovere, efficienza ed efficacia (c'entra anche la meritocrazia, ma viene dopo: da noi manca proprio la cultura del dovere).
Contributi ottimi, grazie trilogy.
Rimangono da risolvere un paio di questioni, posto che è giusto che l'età pensionabile sia adeguata all'aspettativa di vita e quindi vada elevata, come si possono contemporaneamente liberare posti di lavoro per i più giovani, soprattutto in tempo di crisi come oggi. Inoltre è evidente che una PA elefantiaca da sfoltire porterebbe un grosso problema sociale da risolvere: cosa ne facciamo di tutti gli esuberi?


"Dovremmo aver paura del capitalismo, non delle macchine".
(Stephen Hawking)
flaviomob
forumulivista
forumulivista
 
Messaggi: 12704
Iscritto il: 19/06/2008, 19:51

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda franz il 04/09/2011, 9:37

flaviomob ha scritto:Rimangono da risolvere un paio di questioni, posto che è giusto che l'età pensionabile sia adeguata all'aspettativa di vita e quindi vada elevata, come si possono contemporaneamente liberare posti di lavoro per i più giovani, soprattutto in tempo di crisi come oggi. Inoltre è evidente che una PA elefantiaca da sfoltire porterebbe un grosso problema sociale da risolvere: cosa ne facciamo di tutti gli esuberi?

Questioni non da poco. Le possiamo risolvere se usciamo dalla visione statica, dal modello "fisso" per cui se uno lavora di piu' (anziano) allora altri (giovani) lavorano di meno.
Secondo me il problema dell'età pensionabile non è l'unico. Il problema grosso oggi è che c'è un rapporto quasi 1:1 tra lavoratori e pensionati e che si insiste nel dare come pensione retributiva a compartizione (quella dove i contributi sono subito erogati ai pensionati del momento) un importo commisurato ai versamenti. Invece altri paesi danno due pensioni: una commisurata ai versamenti (tramite i fondi pensione) ed una uguale per tutti (un importo prossimo al minimo vitale) con i fondi del sistema a compartizione. Mentre noi oggi nell'industria abbiamo piu' del 50% di trattenute (tra previdenza ed altre assicurazioni sociali obbligatorie) e poi si devono anche pagare le imposte, il sistema che cito porterebbe ad un prelievo del 36%, rendendo buste paga piu' pesanti ma dando anche pensioni di medio livello a tutti (immagino mille euro per ogni over 65). Le due cose (pensioni piu' pesanti per la maggioranza dei pensionati e buste paga piu' pesanti per la totalità dei lavoratori) porterebbe al rilancio dei consumi interni e a nuove assunzioni. E qui c'è spazio per giovani ed anziani. Ed esuberi statali.
Roma ai romani
Anzio agli anziani
(graffito)
Avatar utente
franz
forumulivista
forumulivista
 
Messaggi: 20858
Iscritto il: 17/05/2008, 14:58

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda trilogy il 04/09/2011, 11:55

Un articolo interessante comparso sul "The Telegraph" e tradotto in italiano. Gli aspetti interessanti, a mio parere, sono che mette in luce i veri problemi di fondo che ci sono dietro l'attuale crisi dell'eurozona: differenze di produttività e competitività tra paesi, che una volta sarebbero state corrette con una variazione dei tassi di cambio, ora non è possibile. L'altro aspetto importante è che evidenzia correttamente il legame tra politica monetaria espansiva, eccesso di credito al settore immobiliare, bolla immobiliare, scoppio della bolla immobiliare, contagio e crisi. Argomento sgradito alla politica, che si nasconde dietro il ritornello "la finanza deve tornare alle origini e finanziare l'economia reale", il settore edilizio e immobiliare non sono economia reale? La crisi è partita da un eccesso di credito a quei settori reali che nessuno ha voluto frenare perchè creava occupazione, faceva crescere il PIL e il consenso politico. l'unico posto dove hanno adottato provvedimenti " preventivi" è stato a Honk Kong, e in parte, nel resto della Cina.
ciao
Trilogy

Articolo originale: The Telegraph - In defence of PIGS 17 agosto 2011
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/finance/am ... e-of-pigs/

In difesa dei PIIGS
Dal Telegraph un appassionato articolo controcorrente di Ambrose Evans Pritchard in difesa dei PIIGS, che merita di essere letto sino in fondo. Perchè la crisi di Eurolandia non è solo colpa del Club Med.

di Ambrose Evans-Pritchard – I lettori hanno chiesto un veloce giudizio sul vertice Merkel-Sarkozy.

Non ho nulla da dire. Non c’è stato nessun accordo. E’ stata una vacua riaffermazione di clausole già esistenti nel trattato di Lisbona, o un tentativo di riciclare cose come la Tobin Tax e l’armonizzazione della base imponibile, come se fossero nuove.
Nessun eurobond, nessuna unione fiscale, nessuna spinta al fondo di salvataggio EFSF, nessun cambiamento politico al mandato della BCE. Niente di niente.
Più austerità fiscale per i ritardatari, senza nemmeno il Piano Marshall del 21 luglio. E’ stato un passo indietro nel buco nero.
Come la nomina del Presidente della UE Herman van Rompuy a capo di un governo economico della zona euro, trovo singolare se qualcuno la prende sul serio. Esiste già un Eurogruppo, presieduto da Jean-Claude Juncker.
Il vuoto del vertice – insieme alla teatralità deliziosamente assurda di Sarkozy – ci dice tutto quello che dobbiamo sapere. Né Merkel, né Sarkozy sembrano all’altezza della situazione. L’Europa è alla deriva nella sua crisi esistenziale.


ACQUISTO BOND BCE – La BCE per ora può andare avanti con l’acquisto di 20 miliardi di € di obbligazioni spagnole e italiane alla settimana. Ma una volta che la BCE si avvicina ai € 150 miliardi o giù di lì, i mercati saranno pronti alla prossima crisi.

DEBITO ITALIANO – L’Italia deve rinnovare oltre 68 miliardi di € di debito entro la fine di settembre. Si può essere certi che un gran numero di investitori potranno usufruire dell’intervento della BCE tra oggi ed allora per alleggerire le loro partecipazioni, e passare il rischio ai contribuenti della zona euro. La BCE potrebbe dover acquistare da qui a fine settembre almeno 100 miliardi di € di obbligazioni italiane solo per mantenere il rendimento a 10 anni al 5%.
Forse i Cinesi e gli stati del Golfo continueranno a comprare. Forse no. E questo è abbastanza sul summit.

CROLLO EURO – Quel che mi preoccupa di più è un’intervista di George Soros sulla stampa tedesca che richiama la Grecia e il Portogallo a preparare una “uscita ordinata” dalla zona euro. “L’UE e l’euro lo accetteranno”, ha detto.
Questa è ovviamente musica per le orecchie tedesche. È conforme alla posizione della Bild Zeitung secondo cui la crisi dell’Europa è una questione morale, una debacle causata dalla irresponsabilità e dipendenza dal debito greco-latina. Questa è la Grande Menzogna dell’UEM.

PORTOGALLO CRISI FINANZIARIA – Mr Soros non rende giustizia al Portogallo. Il paese si è comportato bene negli ultimi otto anni (ha avuto una bolla del credito alla fine degli anni ’90 quando l’effetto UEM ha portato a una discesa dei tassi dal 16% al 3%, distruggendo l’economia del Portogallo).
Il Portogallo ha portato il cilicio dal 2003, senza alcun risultato rilevante. Da allora il paese è rimasto intrappolato in una crisi, con la produttività cronicamente bassa, vittima di un disallineamento di valuta intra-UEM contro il blocco tedesco, e un disallineamento extra-UEM contro lo yuan cinese.
Sì, il Portogallo ha fatto un sacco di errori – e chi non li ha fatti – ma non ha violato le regole di Maastricht, né ha mentito sulle sue cifre di bilancio, né ha persistentemente rotto il patto di stabilità dell’Unione europea.

SPAGNA CRISI ECONOMICA 2011 – Nemmeno la Spagna ha violato Maastricht. Ha avuto un avanzo di bilancio del 2% del PIL durante il boom (così come l’Irlanda). Aveva un modesto debito pubblico. La Banca di Spagna ha cercato eroicamente di evitare che la politica monetaria iper-allentata della BCE (con la crescita di M3 a due cifre) alimentasse una bolla immobiliare e del credito, facendo da pioniere con un “rifinanziamento dinamico”.

ITALIA CRISI ECONOMICA 2011- L’Italia ha un avanzo primario di bilancio, e ha riformato il sistema pensionistico. La Commissione europea ha stimato che con le politiche attuali l’Italia avrà il più basso rapporto tra debito pubblico e Pil in Eurolandia entro la metà del secolo. Non sto scherzando. Il più basso.


Siamo tutti d’accordo che questi paesi avrebbero dovuto ristrutturare il loro mercato del lavoro. Non c’è dubbio che i boom-busters (Grecia, Irlanda, Spagna) avrebbero potuto fare di più per “andare contro corrente” – cioè per esempio, fare come Hong Kong, che aggira i problemi del legame con il dollaro stangando sui tassi dei mutui per soffocare il boom immobiliare – ma né la BCE né la Commissione europea hanno spinto per tali misure particolarmente, se non per niente affatto.
La compiacenza era endemica in tutto il sistema dell’UEM. Quindi c’è qualcosa di spiacevole riguardo il tentativo attuale di colpevolizzare le vittime.
La pretesa tedesca che la crisi in Eurolandia sia causata dalla dissolutezza del Club Med è spazzatura intellettuale. Nessuno di noi dovrebbe dare alcun credito a questo argomento egocentrico.

CRISI COLPE GERMANIA – Il problema è profondo e strutturale. Questi paesi sono stati gettati insieme in un’unione monetaria dalla prepotenza dei politici prima che ci fosse una convergenza significativa di produttività, modelli di crescita, di contrattazione salariale,di tendenze inflazionistiche, sistemi giuridici, o di reattività ai tassi di interesse. Le regole di Maastricht hanno mirato a una variabile (debito), ma hanno perso tutte le altre.
Il danno è stato aggravato dalla BCE. Ha fatto funzionare una politica monetaria allentata nei primi anni, violando anno dopo anno i propri obiettivi di M3 e d’inflazione, al fine di aiutare la Germania quando la Germania era in difficoltà (per ragioni congiunturali, ovviamente).
Questo ha notevolmente aggravato le bolle del credito in Irlanda e nel Sud. Non ci sono innocenti in questa storia. Tutti i paesi condividono la colpa. La Germania è un peccatore in tutti i sensi, non ultimo perché sembra ritenere possibile mantenere un avanzo commerciale strutturale permanente, e poi chiedere agli altri di rientrare dai deficit.

Dott. Merkel, Lei ha un dottorato in fisica nucleare. Deve sapere che non ci possono essere degli squilibri buoni (il suo surplus) e degli squilibri cattivi (i deficit spagnolo, italiano, francese, portoghese). La matematica richiede la somma algebrica di una unione monetaria.
Nei tempi passati questi squilibri intra-UEM si sarebbero naturalmente corretti. Il D-Mark si sarebbe rivalutato. La lira e la peseta si sarebbero deprezzate. La dracma sarebbe crollata ancora di più. Problema risolto.
Tale meccanismo correttivo è stato bloccato dalla politica.


Ora abbiamo una situazione straordinaria in cui la Merkel sta spingendo i debitori del sud verso un drastico inasprimento fiscale, senza che il Nord offra alcuno stimolo compensativo. Questo è così stupido (all’interno di una unione monetaria) da lasciare senza fiato. La politica tedesca rischia una implosione auto-rinforzante di tutto il sistema, molto simile al primo Gold Standard del 1930 – a meno chela BCE contrasti questa deriva con un QE ad oltranza, cosa che anch’essa è contro la politica tedesca.

Sì, lo so, un sacco di lettori sono a favore dell’austerità fiscale come un fine in sé. Ma fino ad un certo punto. Non bisogna confondere la moralità delle finanze della famiglia (il risparmio è un bene) con gli imperativi completamente diversi della macro-economia ( troppo risparmio è pessimo, e conduce alla depressione).

Sarkozy non ha dimostrato molta immaginazione o capacità di leadership. Invece di fare da spalla al Cancelliere Merkel, avrebbe potuto utilmente farsi carico della crisi e condurre una liberazione dei paesi latini.
Se tutto il resto fallisce, dovrebbe scrivere una lettera da parte dei leaders di Francia, Italia, Spagna, Portogallo, Irlanda, Cipro (oltre a Belgio, Malta e Slovenia, se vogliono) chiedendo il ritiro della Germania e dei suoi satelliti dall’unione monetaria. La Germania otterrebbe la moneta forte che desidera e di cui ha bisogno.
Se il blocco tedesco pensa che il nuovo super-Marco salirebbe troppo – e causerebbe enormi perdite alle banche teutoniche per l’esposizione al Club Med – potrebbe ancorare la valuta all’euro latino con un premio del 30% e utilizzare i controlli di capitale fino a quando le acque si saranno calmate.

La mia ipotesi è che, una volta inciso l’ascesso, l’Europa comincerebbe a recuperare molto velocemente. Il blocco latino diventerebbe una delle regioni emergenti, e mangerebbe a pranzo in Germania per un decennio o giù di lì. La crisi del debito svanirebbe come un incubo dimenticato. Sarkozy potrebbe camminare a testa alta, per così dire.
La Germania può accettare questo o andare avanti a sborsare prestiti di soccorso e pagare trasferimenti anno dopo anno fino alla rivolta dei suoi cittadini. Quello che non può aspettarsi è di avere tutto a proprio comodo mantenendo per sempre la sua quota di esportazioni tramite un sistema monetario truccato.
Ah, ma che succede se la Germania si rifiuta sia di sostenere un’unione fiscale sia di lasciare l’UEM?
Götterdämmerung (il crepuscolo degli dei).
di Carmen Gallus, curatrice sezione Estero

da: http://www.investireoggi.it/estero/in-difesa-dei-piigs/
Ultima modifica di trilogy il 04/09/2011, 12:26, modificato 7 volte in totale.
Chiunque ha tentato di creare uno Stato perfetto, un paradiso in terra, ha in realtà realizzato un inferno. Popper
Avatar utente
trilogy
Redattore
Redattore
 
Messaggi: 4196
Iscritto il: 23/05/2008, 22:58

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda flaviomob il 04/09/2011, 12:09

Ma i fondi pensione non sono quelli che hanno preso mazzate incredibili dalla crisi? All'estero ci sono garanzie migliori per i fondi pensione rispetto all'Italia?


"Dovremmo aver paura del capitalismo, non delle macchine".
(Stephen Hawking)
flaviomob
forumulivista
forumulivista
 
Messaggi: 12704
Iscritto il: 19/06/2008, 19:51

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda flaviomob il 04/09/2011, 15:01

dal manifesto on line:

Bengt-Aake Lundvall*
Quando l’Europa ha svoltato a destra


Aprendo il dibattito su “La rotta d’Europa” aperta da il manifesto, Sbilanciamoci.info e openDemocracy.net, Rossana Rossanda ha chiesto agli economisti e ad altri una valutazione della crisi dell’euro e dell’Unione economica e monetaria (Uem). Mario Pianta e Donatella della Porta hanno dato le loro risposte e io sono d’accordo con le loro tesi di fondo. Pianta ha ragione nel sottolineare che la crescente diseguaglianza economica e il dogma neoliberale hanno contribuito alla crisi presente. E Donatella della Porta ha ragione a indicare nella mancanza di legittimazione democratica uno dei problemi più grossi della situazione attuale, in cui l’integrazione europea è spinta dalla necessità di evitare una crisi economica mondiale. Vorrei mostrare come la forma e profondità di tale crisi rivelino la debolezza di fondo dei percorsi intrapresi dall’integrazione europea. La Strategia di Lisbona lanciata nel 2000 è stata dirottata a metà strada verso una via
neoliberale, e ora la Strategia Europa 2020 continua sul binario sbagliato. Tali iniziative non hanno costruito le fondamenta necessarie per l’Uem. E l’Unione monetaria, pensata per proteggere i paesi membri dall’instabilità economica, è diventata essa stessa una fonte d’instabilità per tutto il mondo. Se la Uem è stata una costruzione sbagliata fin dall’inizio, ora è estremamente pericoloso lasciarla disintegrare. Nonostante la retorica che addossa tutte le colpe ai governi degli stati, i leader nazionali potrebbero essere costretti a portare l’Europa verso una federazione, non perché questo faccia parte della loro visione, ma perché devono evitare una depressione globale. Si tratta di scelte difficili che che si scontreranno con il populismo nazionalista di un’Europa senza una visione democratica radicata e comune che vada al di là del mercato unico.

Da Lisbona a Europa 2020

I contesti internazionali del 2000 e del 2010 erano profondamente diversi. Negli anni ‘90, quando fu lanciata la Strategia di Lisbona, l’occupazione e i tassi di crescita negli Usa erano più alti che in Europa, e l’ipotesi più diffusa era che questo fosse il risultato della ‘nuova economia’ americana, fondata su mercati meno regolati, più attività imprenditoriali e maggiori investimenti nel capitale della conoscenza. Si pensava che in Europa la crescita fosse ostacolata dalla ‘rigidità’ soprattutto del mercato del lavoro, e dallo scarso investimento in ricerca. La strategia Europa 2020 viene introdotta in un contesto tutto diverso, in cui gli Usa come l’Europa soffrono le conseguenze della crisi finanziaria, la crisi ecologica è diventata una priorità e la concorrenza più temibile viene dalla Cina e dall’India più che dagli Usa.
Queste differenze di modalità e contesto si riflettono nel contenuto della nuova strategia. Nella Strategia di Lisbona la Ue si proponeva un nuovo obiettivo strategico: ‘diventare l’economia più competitiva e dinamica basata sulla conoscenza, capace di una crescita economica sostenibile con maggiore e migliore occupazione e una più grande coesione sociale’. Quel traguardo richiedeva di ‘preparare la transizione verso un’economia e una società basate sulla conoscenza, attraverso politiche migliori per la società dell’informazione e la ricerca e sviluppo (R&S), accelerando riforme strutturali per la competitività e l’innovazione, completando il mercato unico, modernizzando il modello sociale europeo, investendo sulle persone e combattendo l’esclusione sociale; sostenendo buone prospettive economiche e crescita, applicando un insieme appropriato di politiche macroeconomiche’.
Ora la nuova strategia Europa 2020 sottolinea tre priorità: “crescita intelligente”: sviluppo di un’economia basata su conoscenza e innovazione; “crescita sostenibile: promozione di un’economia più efficiente rispetto alle risorse, più verde e più competitiva”; “crescita inclusiva’: sostenere un’economia ad alta occupazione che produca coesione sociale e territoriale”. C’è una differenza di fondo che va sottolineata: le ambizioni si sono decisamente ridimensionate. Nella strategia Europa 2020 non si promette che l’Europa diventerà la regione più competitiva del mondo e si riconosce che la crisi economica ha avuto un forte impatto negativo su occupazione e reddito.

Quando l’Europa è andata a destra

Nell’orientamento generale delle due strategie esiste una continuità, ma si è verificato un cambiamento delle priorità a qualche anno dalla strategia di Lisbona, con un indebolimento della dimensione sociale e una maggiore attenzione a crescita e occupazione. E’ avvenuto con la valutazione di medio termine 2004-05, in cui si sosteneva che la strategia era ‘troppo complessa’, con troppi obiettivi. Motivo per cui sarebbe stato necessario concentrare tutti gli sforzi su occupazione e crescita economica. Un cambiamento che rifletteva quello del panorama politico europeo, con i governi socialdemocratici che erano stati sostituiti da governi molto più a destra.
Tale cambiamento ha ridimensionato l’obiettivo, passando da ‘maggiore e migliore occupazione’ a ‘maggiore occupazione’ e basta, ponendo l’accento sulla ‘flessisicurezza’ ma con un’attenzione esclusiva per l’elemento flessibilità. Con le nuove priorità, il concetto di coesione sociale viene inteso in modo restrittivo e tradotto in obiettivi rivolti alla riduzione della povertà. Va notato come la ‘maggiore e migliore occupazione’ sia diventata, nell’introduzione alla strategia Europa 2020, un più vago ‘maggiore occupazione e vite migliori’.
Se la prospettiva generale della strategia di Lisbona, e in particolare l’attenzione alla coesione sociale e alla società basata sulla conoscenza, andavano nella direzione giusta, i politici che dovevano realizzarla hanno visto la ‘coesione sociale’ come un peso per l’Europa piuttosto che come il fondamento necessario per un’economia basata sulla conoscenza. Di conseguenza l’attuazione si è fatta sempre più squilibrata, dominata dall’interpretazione neoliberale delle ‘riforme strutturali’ e dalla flessibilizzazione.


La strategia di Lisbona come sostegno alla Uem

Fin dal principio (1996), la Strategia europea per l’occupazione venne presentata come un complemento necessario per l’Unione monetaria europea. La stessa cosa si può dire della strategia successiva, quella di Lisbona. Quando fu istituita la Uem, molte voci avvertirono che un’unione monetaria senza politica fiscale comune sarebbe stata vulnerabile da attacchi esterni. Il bilancio totale della Ue è solo una piccola percentuale del Pil e non può avere lo stesso ruolo di stabilizzatore automatico che ha il bilancio federale Usa. Questo era particolarmente problematico per un’unione valutaria che metteva insieme paesi a livelli molto diversi di sviluppo economico. La Strategia di Lisbona si può vedere come un tentativo di compensare questa fondamentale debolezza dell’Unione monetaria.
Sono state date due interpretazioni contrapposte del perché la Strategia di Lisbona potesse funzionare come sostegno all’Uem. L’interpretazione neoliberale era che il coordinamento delle politiche avrebbe dovuto rendere più flessibili i mercati del lavoro dell’Europa meridionale, in modo che gli eventuali choc esterni venissero assorbiti attraverso un’immediata riduzione dei salari reali. L’interpretazione neo-riformista era che le regioni meridionali meno sviluppate sarebbero state aiutate ad allinearsi al Nord grazie agli ambiziosi investimenti nella loro base di conoscenze.
Se la strategia di Lisbona fosse riuscita a ridurre le disuguaglianze regionali all’interno della Uem migliorando conoscenze e struttura industriale del Sud dell’Europa – puntando a un’occupazione di qualità, meno esposta alla concorrenza mondiale - l’attuale crisi della Uem forse non sarebbe stata così drammatica. Non è un caso che i paesi oggi esposti alla speculazione finanziaria siano quelli che hanno la struttura industriale più debole e la maggior quota di posti di lavoro direttamente esposti alla concorrenza delle economie emergenti.
Questo avrebbe richiesto maggiore, non minore, attenzione alla coesione regionale e sociale, e riforme dei mercati del lavoro e dei sistemi scolastici volte a migliorare le competenze e l’organizzazione del lavoro, così come gandi investimenti nelle infrastrutture cuturali. Ma l’agenda di Lisbona si è andata orientando sempre più verso la strada neoliberale. La situazione attuale mostra che questo spostamento a destra non solo è stato inadeguato, ma ha finito per creare una struttura istituzionale distorta, che ora minaccia di far crollare non solo le economie europee, ma anche quella mondiale.


L’ombra della crisi mondiale

La crisi dell’euro va vista nel più ampio contesto della globalizzazione dei mercati finanziari, che ha reso più esporte le economie più piccole e ha ridotto le possibilità di una politica economica autonoma da parte dei governi. Nella prospettiva globale tutti i paesi europei sono “piccoli”; quelli grandi – Usa, Giappone e Cina - sono meno vulnerabili dalla speculazione finanziaria, ma diventano anche loro sempre più “piccoli” nel senso che si vanno riducendo i margini di quello che possono fare come politica economica autonoma.
L’Unione economica e monetaria può essere vista come il tentativo di trasformare l’Europa in un paese “grande”, proteggendo i piccoli paesi europei e rendendoli più capaci di superare crisi e speculazioni esterne. Ma si tratta di un tentativo fallito che ha dato ragione a quanti sostenevano che era poco saggio creare un’unione valutaria in assenza di unione fiscale. La Grecia, il Portogallo, la Spagna, l’Italia e più di recente anche la Francia hanno visto la speculazione finanziaria aumentare i costi del debito pubblico. C’è ora il rischio reale di uno scenario che vede uno o più di questi paesi che fanno bancarotta, un conseguente crollo delle grandi banche e una crisi finanziaria generale, che porta a una depressione mondiale.
Il timore che l’economia nazionale finisca sotto il tiro della speculazione finanziaria costringe i governi nazionali a tagliare i bilanci e stimolare gli investimenti privati abbassando le tasse sui ricchi e sulle imprese. Questo è anche il tipo di risposta auspicato con forza dalla cancelliera tedesca Angela Merkel. Ma gli sforzi per rafforzare la ‘competitività internazionale’ dei singoli paesi hanno un impatto negativo sulla domanda a livello globale. Se possono essere ritenuti utili per limitare l’esposizione delle singole economie, accentuano però la possibilità di uno tsunami finanziario.
Sembra impossibile che i leader europei vogliano riformare una delle fonti principali dell’instabilità: il modo in cui operano i mercati finanziari nel breve termine. Quali sono allora le alternative? Per i governi è essenziale evitare che la crisi dell’euro produca l’insolvenza di uno dei paesi membri. Una delle proposte è quella di istituire obbligazioni europee (gli eurobond) il cui valore sia garantito insieme da un gruppo di paesi. Sarebbe un primo passo verso la trasformazione dell’Europa in senso federale. Ma se il bisogno di ‘più Europa’ è acuto quando si tratta di costruire barriere contro uno spaventoso tsunami finanziario, la sensazione della crisi ridà fiato ai sentimenti nazionalistici e rafforza gli schieramenti politici che si oppongono a politiche di solidarietà internazionale.

Le strade possibili

La maggior parte delle priorità definite dalla strategia Europa 2020 sono risposte rilevanti alle sfide che l’Europa si trova oggi ad affrontare, ma non rappresentano nel breve termine una protezione di fronte a uno tsunami finanziario. La Strategia di Lisbona può essere vista come il tentativo di creare una convergenza istituzionale e politica in Europa con lo scopo di costruire un’unione forte e coesa, fondata sul principio di solidarietà. Ma l’approccio realizzato, con l’accento sulle ‘buone pratiche’, e la valutazione dei risultati delle politiche nelle diverse aree (benchmarking) è stato del tutto tecnocratico, incapace di suscitare un’adesione popolare al progetto europeo. Perché i cittadini europei si mobilitino per il progetto-Europa ci vuole una visione capace di andare oltre il mercato unico.
In un testo importante, scritto in occasione del convegno “L’identità europea in un’economia globale” in preparazione del Summit di Lisbona sotto la presidenza portoghese, Manuel Castells avveva sostenuto la necessità di una “comune identità europea in base alla quale i cittadini in tutta Europa possano condividere i problemi e cercarne insieme la soluzione”. Dopo aver scartato cultura e religione, Castells aveva individuato “i sentimenti condivisi sulla necessità di una protezione sociale universale delle condizioni di vita, la solidarietà sociale, un lavoro stabile, i diritti dei lavoratori, i diritti umani universali, la preoccupazione per i poveri del mondo, l’estensione della democrazia a tutti i livelli” Se le istituzioni europee dovessero promuovere quei valori, diceva, forse “il progetto identità” potrebbe crescere.
Per mobilitare il sostegno popolare e ricostruire l’Uem è necessario ridefinirla in modo che
riconosca la ‘dimensione sociale’, trasformandola in una Unione economica e sociale (Ues). Questo dovrebbe andare di pari passo con riforme dei processi decisionali capaci di unire in modi nuovi partecipazione democratica ed efficienza. C’è bisogno di una svolta nel paradigma delle politiche, che trasformi il timore dell’intervento statale e la fede nei mercati in una prospettiva in cui i governi possano assumersi i compiti necessari a promuovere una solida crescita economica. Questo richiede una regolamentazione internazionale molto più severa dei mercati finanziari. Ma soprattutto richiede di ridisegnare le istituzioni e le politiche di settore, con la consapevolezza della fase nuova che stiamo attraversando in cui la conoscenza è la maggiore risorsa e l’apprendimento è il processo più importante.
Ma il tempo stringe, ed è probabile che assisteremo a piccoli e riluttanti passi dei leader europei verso una politica fiscale comune, passi che verranno fatti senza sostegno popolare e con scarso coinvolgimento delle istituzioni. L’argomentazione dei leader europei - in cui presentano ciascuna riforma come fatta in nome della Grecia, del Portogallo, della Spagna etc., e non per salvare la loro economia dalla depressione – non è di alcun aiuto. Se nella loro marcia esitante dovessero inciampare, è possibile che cadremo nella prima depressione economica dopo gli anni Trenta.


*Bengt-Åke Lundvall ha scritto il primo manuale di economia marxista in Svezia negli anni ’70 ed è stato vice-direttore dell’Ocse nel 1992-95. Ha partecipato alla preparazione della Stategia di Lisbone della Ue. E’ professore alla Aalborg University in Danimarca e a Sciences Po a Parigi. E’ noto per i suoi lavori sull’economia dell’apprendimento e sui sistemi innovativi.


"Dovremmo aver paura del capitalismo, non delle macchine".
(Stephen Hawking)
flaviomob
forumulivista
forumulivista
 
Messaggi: 12704
Iscritto il: 19/06/2008, 19:51

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda trilogy il 04/09/2011, 15:25

flaviomob ha scritto:Ma i fondi pensione non sono quelli che hanno preso mazzate incredibili dalla crisi? All'estero ci sono garanzie migliori per i fondi pensione rispetto all'Italia?


I fondi pensione investono sui mercati finanziari, se questi vanno in crisi anche loro ne subiscono le conseguenza. all'apice della crisi il valore dei loro portafogli scese di circa 4500 miliardi di $ , meno 20/25%.
Questo dice poco in generale. Per un lavoratore che sta per andare in pensione può essere una tragedia, per uno che si trova all'inizio della carriera può essere una benedizione se i rendimenti medi futuri si riporteranno nella media.
I fondi italiani presentano una rischiosità che è nella media internazionale, forse sono mediamente meno rischiosi di quelli anglosassoni. Un aspetto particolare italiano è il conflitto d'interessi strutturale che c'è nel settore, dato che a tutti i livelli trovi i rappresentanti delle parti sociali. Sia a livello di controllori che di controllati.
Per il resto si conoscono bene i problemi che i mutamenti demografici provocano nei sistemi pensionistici a ripartizione, mentre sono meno conosciuti gli effetti dei mutamenti demografici sui mercati finanziari e sui fondi pensione.
La generazione del baby boom comincia ad andare in pensione e da 10 anni il mercato americano oscilla senza una vera crescita. Se questo andamento si protrae nel tempo: o i fondi pensione si adeguano e fanno trading cercando di sfruttare i sali e scendi del mercato per ottenere rendimenti, oppure ciccia. :mrgreen:

Immagine
Ultima modifica di trilogy il 04/09/2011, 15:38, modificato 1 volta in totale.
Chiunque ha tentato di creare uno Stato perfetto, un paradiso in terra, ha in realtà realizzato un inferno. Popper
Avatar utente
trilogy
Redattore
Redattore
 
Messaggi: 4196
Iscritto il: 23/05/2008, 22:58

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda franz il 04/09/2011, 15:34

flaviomob ha scritto:Ma i fondi pensione non sono quelli che hanno preso mazzate incredibili dalla crisi? All'estero ci sono garanzie migliori per i fondi pensione rispetto all'Italia?

Naturalmente un fondo che investe in modo pur bilanciato (con un mix prudenziale di azioni, obbligazioni e immobili) e solido (AAA) vien sempre coinvlto in una crisi. Vale per i nostri risparmi come vale per ogni cosa. Anche le bolle immobiliari possono scoppiare e quindi il mattone non è sempre un investimento solido. Anche se teniano i sodi sotto il materasso possono bruciare. Non esiste quindi, oggettivamente nessun impiego sicuro nel tempo. Ma qualcuno è piu' sicuro di altri. Oro e Franchi Svizzeri per esempio, sono da decenni ottimi beni rifugio, ma non sono infiniti e quindi non tutti li possono comprare. Per quanto riguarda gli investimenti dei fondi pensione si tratta, come è ovvio, di investimenti sul lungo periodo (40 massimo, in media 20). Ora non esiste asset (fondi, obbligazioni, immobili, oro) che nel lungo periodo, quello che serve a maturare un rendimento previdenziale, che si discosti dalla crescita del PIL nello stesso lungo periodo.
E qui torniamo. Se il PIL USA in 40 anni cresce del 4.5% all'anno, possiamo in media garantire che anche i fondi pensione possono seguire quel rendimento medio nello stesso perioso . E quindi un versamento periodico di 500 dollari (o euro) al mese dopo 40 anni ti rende 650'000 dollari (o euro) di capitale. A questo punto puoi decidere se ritirare il capitale (perchè magari sai che ti rimangono pochi anni di vita e lo vuoi passare agli eredi) oppure convertirlo in una rendita, perche immagini di campare fino a 110 anni.
Naturalmente se osservi il rendimento durante un periodo di forte crescita esso sarà fortissimo mentre negli anni di crisi sarà bassissimo, ma sono solo osservazioni virtuali, che si concretizzano solo se - in quel momento di congiuntura sfavorevole - il fondo vendesse tutto.
Tornando al caso italiano, il dramma è che l'economia non cresce, quindi anche i fondi possono crescere poco.
Ma anche se l'economia crescesse solo dell'1% (non dei 4.5%) avremmo pur sempre quasi 300'000 euro da un versamento di 500 al mese. Tenuto conto che è palese che 650'000 è meglio di 300'000 (a parità di inflazione) bisgona vedere perchè la nostra economia non cresce.
Non cresce perché lo stato dirotta il 50% delle risorse nazionali verso attività imporoduttive (auto blu, corruzione, tantissime pensioni a tantissime persone ma di basso importo, poca ricerca, sanlità scandente, giustizia lenta etc).
Cambiamo questo aseptto e l'economia tornerà gradualmente a crescere e con essa potranno crescere i fondi pensione.
Ultima modifica di franz il 04/09/2011, 15:44, modificato 1 volta in totale.
Roma ai romani
Anzio agli anziani
(graffito)
Avatar utente
franz
forumulivista
forumulivista
 
Messaggi: 20858
Iscritto il: 17/05/2008, 14:58

Re: Articoli e Commenti dal resto del mondo

Messaggioda flaviomob il 04/09/2011, 15:42

Euro crisis: how long can Germany remain the saviour?
Greece, Portugal, Ireland… as Angela Merkel faces a rebellion in parliament, Germany is divided over the single currency


reddit this
Comments (22)
Helen Pidd in Frankfurt
The Observer, Sunday 4 September 2011
Article history

Equity traders relax over a beer outside Germany's stock exchange building in Frankfurt last Friday. Photograph: Frank Rumpenhorst for the Observer
"Das Titanic Szenario" was the headline on Friday on the front page of Handelsblatt, one of Germany's most-respected business newspapers. Inside, Angela Merkel was pictured, arms outstretched, on the bow of the sinking ship, with Nicolas Sarkozy in the Leonardo DiCaprio role embracing her from behind. Days earlier Jacques Delors, a former president of the European Commission, had said the eurozone was "on the brink of the abyss".

There was similar doom-mongering in Der Spiegel. "The euro can't survive in its current form," proclaimed Hans-Joachim Voth, an eminent economic history professor from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. Some countries were going to have to leave "if [the EU] wants to become anything more than just a transfer union", he said, adding that "it would be simpler to have the stronger countries veer off". And which of the 17 eurozone nations did he have in mind? Deutschland.

But could Germany seriously leave the euro? Is the common currency on the verge of collapse? "It's not looking good," said Jane Dill, a 20-year-old logistics student on a college outing to the Money Museum of the Bundesbank, Germany's National Bank, in Frankfurt. "How much longer can things go on like this? First Greece asks for help, then Portugal, Ireland, maybe Spain and Italy. What are we going to do when the next countries fail? You can't just keep chucking money at them. And what if Germany needs help? Who will come to our aid?"

"Even the rouble's more reliable," said her classmate, Edward Krieger, a 24-year-old with an even gloomier Weltanschauung. "I honestly believe the euro has no future. It's going to crash and a whole new currency is going to have to be brought in. Maybe money as we know it will be abolished. I think in 20 years' time there will be one currency used by everyone in the world."

In the gift shop at the foot of the European Central Bank (ECB) tower, Gebhard Klotz was more optimistic. "Will the euro collapse? No!" scoffed the 64-year-old shop assistant as he tidied the display of chocolate money. "The euro will survive. Of course it will. Unity costs money, that's all. It's just the way it is."

In his office 34 floors up, Jean-Claude Trichet, president of the ECB, would share this optimism. "Weaknesses need to be corrected," he conceded in an interview with Il Sole 24 Ore last week. But the single currency was "credible" and "over the past 12 years has kept its value in terms of price stability in a remarkable way in comparison with the previous national currencies in the past 50 years".

Much has been written about German nostalgia for the deutschmark; last December some stalls at the Christmas market in Berlin's Gendarmenmarkt let punters pay with the old currency in what proved to be a very popular marketing gimmick. Around the same time, a survey by Cologne's YouGov-Institute found that 49% of Germans want the "D-mark" back.

However, if Klotz's customers are anything to go by, the longing is not widespread in Frankfurt. His shop sells two ranges of mugs, one plastered with euro notes, another, also priced at €6.90, depicting the deutschmark.

"The euro is much more popular," said Klotz's colleague, a 23-year-old coin enthusiast called Florian Koch. "We sell 30 or 40 of them every day."

Both men were adamant they would not soon be made redundant or the shop reborn as a shrine to what once was. "Yes, the euro is sick," said Koch, a business student at Frankfurt University, "but it's healthier than many other currencies. It's limping at the moment, but it's not going to go kaput."

This week is a big one for the euro in Germany. On Wednesday, the constitutional court in Karlsruhe will deliver its eagerly awaited verdict in three cases brought by five eurosceptic academics and a renegade MP from the Christian Socialist Union, the Bavarian sister party to Merkel's Christian Democratic Union. The plaintiffs argue that last year's bailout of Greece, Ireland and Portugal was illegal because it was not debated in the Bundestag, Germany's parliament.

Merkel spent yesterday mourning the death of her father on Friday. This Thursday she must quell a threatened revolt in her own parliamentary bloc when the Bundestag begins debating the controversial expansion of the rescue fund, which increases Germany's share of guarantees to up to €211bn (£184bn) from a previous €123bn – about two-thirds of the annual federal budget. MPs will vote on the changes on 29 September. And Friday is the deadline for private-sector participation in a second Greek rescue package, Merkel having asked the commercial world to voluntarily chip in after resolutely failing in a bid to force them to do so. News that Greece is set to miss its latest financial targets will not have bolstered confidence.

As Europe's largest economy, Germany foots more than a quarter of the bill for eurozone bailouts. Much of that money stems from Frankfurt am Rhein, the birthplace of Goethe, a surprisingly small city affectionately referred to as a "village of skyscrapers". Despite only being Germany's fifth-largest metropolis, with a population of just over 688,000, it is the financial capital of not just Germany but also the eurozone.

Frankfurt's stock exchange, the Deutsche Börse, is more of a tourist attraction than a trading hall in these unromantic days when all you need to trade is a powerful computer and a strong disposition. But the neo-Renaissance sandstone building remains at the heart of the financial district.

Every Friday lunchtime, suited and booted bankers ring in the weekend with a glass of local wine or beer at the weekly farmers' market, which sets up outside the exchange by the famous Bear and Bull sculpture, which is a metaphor for the rise and fall of the Dax, Germany's equivalent of the FTSE.

It did not feel pessimistic last week. Harald Feick had lined up three glasses of wine. "Two friends are coming! They are not all for me!" he insisted, and explained why he has no fear for Europe's common currency. Describing himself as "ein bankmensch", he said the crisis was "not about the euro; it's about financial mismanagement in certain European governments. The Greeks would be in the same trouble if they still had the drachma."

The German media was too pessimistic, he reckoned. "You hear all the gloom, but a lot less about the fact that, despite the crisis, we have decreasing unemployment and an economy that is growing, albeit slowly." Quarterly economic growth slowed to 0.1% in April-June.

Robert Hung, a blond banking lawyer in a crisp white shirt and dark suit, said the tabloid media – in particular the three million-selling Bild – was partly to blame for a feeling of discontent among the general population, spreading the overly simplistic idea that money earned by hard-working, prudent Germans was being frittered away by profligate Mediterraneans.

Hung, 36, and his heavily pregnant wife, Fabienne, said they had been on holiday to Greece this summer and were "embarrassed" at the reputation Germans had on Crete. "When the receptionist saw our passports, he said, 'Please, when you go home, tell everyone that not all Greeks are lazy. Tell them that many of us work very hard'," said Fabienne. "It was embarrassing."

Hung admits he is having a good crisis – he has been inundated with cases from banks defending themselves from crash-related lawsuits – but not everyone is a winner.

"We can't rescue everyone," said Barbara Schiml, enjoying a wine in the sunshine with her husband, Udo. "The government needs to set boundaries. We can't keep bailing out other countries for ever." The couple agreed it should be harder for other countries to join the common currency in future.

Antonia Gugel and her friend Elisabeth Brändl, both in their 80s, are typical of a generation which grew up treasuring the deutschmark. They are, to put it mildly, disapproving of the current mess. "When we started work after the war, there was nothing. Germany was in ruins. We had to build up everything ourselves," said Gugel.

"We worked Monday to Saturday, had 12 days' holiday a year and didn't spend what we didn't have. Young people today have grown up in prosperity. If they want something, they put it on their credit cards. They have never had to learn the value of money. That's at the root of all these problems."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/se ... as-sarkozy


"Dovremmo aver paura del capitalismo, non delle macchine".
(Stephen Hawking)
flaviomob
forumulivista
forumulivista
 
Messaggi: 12704
Iscritto il: 19/06/2008, 19:51

Prossimo

Torna a Rubriche fisse

Chi c’è in linea

Visitano il forum: Nessuno e 1 ospite